Short Courses

RFG is offering a large variety of pre and post-conference short courses. All short courses will be held at the Convention Centre. To register for the conference and short courses, click here. If you want to register for a short course only (not for the conference), the short course fee will be $100 more than what is listed below.

The organization reserves the right to cancel a short course if this one has not reach the minimum of participants. In that case, you will be notified by email of the cancellation around mid-May.

The short courses below are being given at the Resources For Future Generations Conference this year. All cancelled short courses are/will be removed from this page.

Pre-conference 2 Days Short Courses

Saturday and Sunday, June 16 and 17, 2018

Description:

The 1815 William Smith geological map of England and Wales, seen as the first formal geological map, was 3D to the extent that it was accompanied by cross-sections. Since then, geological mapping has become fundamental to all geoscience and its application to energy, minerals, water, engineering, and hazards. In the late 1990s, geological survey agencies began to more comprehensively map the thickness and properties of multiple strata, and selected deformed structures, in a 3D GIS environment. Developments were driven by progress in digital methods, large databases, and geophysical methods, concurrent with escalating societal needs. 3D models are quickly becoming the standard for assessing resource potential and geological risk for both industry and government agencies, and are frequently used to assist with stakeholder engagement and communication. A series of workshops designed to facilitate sharing of best practices in this field was initiated by Berg and Thorleifson in 2001, later joined by Russell and MacCormack. This biennial series has become an international forum regularly attended by 50 to 100 survey practitioners and allied persons that has been held in Illinois, Denver, Ontario, Salt Lake, Portland, Minneapolis, and Baltimore. For the proposed 2018 workshop at RFG in Vancouver, multiple speakers from North America, Europe, and China are already confirmed.

Objectives:

The objective is to facilitate sharing of best practices in regional 3D geological mapping and resultant modelling, with an emphasis on sediments and sedimentary basins. Topics will include program design, data compilation, model construction, uncertainty, innovation in 3D visualization, communication of model results to stakeholders, accessibility and dissemination of model products, information management, and the use of 3D products to support science-based decision making.

Target Audience:

Geological survey agency managers and geologists, academic and industry partners and users, as well as less experienced geologists and information managers who seek to enter the field

Short Course Organizer:

Minnesota Geological Survey

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

The facilitators are the organizers of a biennial series of 3D geological mapping workshops that began in 2001, and that has been the model for workshops now operating elsewhere in the world: Richard Berg PhD, Illinois State Geological Survey; Kelsey MacCormack PhD, Alberta Geological Survey; Hazen Russell PhD, Geological Survey of Canada; Harvey Thorleifson PhD, Minnesota Geological Survey.

Price:

$240 include course notes, coffee breaks and 2 luncheons

Description:

Mineral deposit evaluation involves various studies and projects aimed at estimation of mineral resources, characterizing the ore body and assessing the risks and opportunities in the process of development of the project. The processes followed for the development of the mineral deposits in the world are different in different due to many conditions. However there are also similarities at a higher level. For an example, the sequence of studies and various projects in a study are common in various parts of the world.

This short course will focus on the best practices followed in i) Project development and sequence of studies, ii) best practices in resource estimation and classification, ii) International reporting standards and iv) assessment of risks due to geological controls of mineralization and v) tips for writing a good technical report.

Objectives:

The participants of this course will be able to participate in discussions and learn the best practices followed in the world in the evaluation of a mineral deposit. Through a combination of multiple group discussions and exercises the course provides an unique learning experience for the participants.

The short course is designed to provide some key tips for enhancing quality of the study process and enhancing confidence on mineral resource estimates and producing a technical report rich in its contents.

The program will feature live demonstration of state of the art geostatistical software - ISATIS (from Geovariances, France) and allow participants to use software free of cost for a limited time after the course.

See brochure

Target Audience:

Mining industry professionals, researchers and academicians.

Short Course Organizer:

GeoGlobal, LLC

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Abani R. Samal is well recognized for his expertise in mineral deposit evaluation, resource estimation and advanced geostatistical analyses. He has extensive training (MS and PhD) in economic geology and geostatistics. In last 20 years in industry, he has gained experience in various commodities including gold, iron ore, complex sulphide deposits such as Cu-Mo-Au-Ag, Pb-Zn-Ag etc. and industrial minerals around the world. His industry experience includes strategic planning for mineral exploration, resource estimation, applied geostatistics, mine to mill reconciliation. The exploration and mining projects where Dr Samal has worked on include Brisas gold project (Venezuela), Black-Fox (Canada), Resolution copper (USA), Kisanfu copper deposit (DRC), Bingham Canyon Mine (USA), Oyu Tolgoi (Mongolia), Boron (USA), Southern System iron ore deposits (Brazil), Las Truchas iron ore deposits (Mexico), Diavik diamond deposit (Canada), beach sand (rutile) deposits (India, Africa) and Onća-Puma lateritic nickel deposits in Brazil. Dr. Samal is a registered member of SME (RM-SME), a certified professional geologist (CPG) and a Fellow of the Society for Economic Geologists (SEG), Fellow of the Geological Society of India, Life member of IAMG, MEAI, MGMI and SGAT. Dr Samal is a qualified person as per international resource reserve reporting standards such as JORC and NI-43-101. He is providing professional development programs to the mineral industry worldwide in the areas of Mineral resource estimation, Geostatistics, Mining project development and studies, Resource reporting using international reporting standards. Dr. Samal's contributions to the industry are well recognized through his publications and presentations at various national and international conferences. He enjoys speaking at professional events and major academic / research institutions. Most recently, he spoke at the international conference of CRIRSCO (India, November 2016), The CTMF Conference (NY, April, 2017).

Price:

$750 include course notes, coffee breaks and 2 luncheons

Pre-conference One-Day Short Course

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Description:

As the role of Earth science in society grows, so too does the need for effective science communication. Unleash your inner science communicator and join our interactive short course to explore why we communicate science, who are our audiences, how to refine your Earth science message, and pick up some tips communicating through different formats

Location:

Simon Fraser University Vancouver Campus (Harbour Centre), 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

Schedule:

Saturday June 16, 10:00-4:00

Price:

$50 (lunch included)

Description:

Isotope geochemistry is an integral part of the Earth sciences, particularly in revealing the fourth dimension of our science (time), reveling the processes involved in natural systems, and tracing the flux of elements through geosphere-hydrosphere-biosphere systems. As such, isotope geochemistry is built on a platform of pure and theoretical science, but is primarily an applied science that adds value to mineral exploration, environmental stewardship, whole earth ecology, timing and causes of evolution, paleoclimates and even food authentication. As an applied science, isotope geochemistry has expanded from traditional light stable isotopes and long-lived decay systems studied by a few experts into studies involving most elements in the periodic table, additional geochronometers and enhanced integration with other aspects of Earth science by a broad range of users. This course addresses the recent applications of isotope geochemistry in the Earth sciences and how integration with other disciplines represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the processes that operate in natural systems. Those involved in the course include the top isotope geochemists in Canada.

Topics covered in this short-course include:

  1. Application of isotopes to exploration for VMS deposits
  2. Applied U-Pb geochronology of ore minerals by SIMS
  3. Application of Pb isotopes in exploration and environmental science
  4. Isotopes in Two-Component Mixing and in Fluid-rock Interaction
  5. Detrital zircon probability visualization and provenance identification utilizing data mining
  6. Geochemistry of heavy metal isotopes: tracers of anthropogenic sources and environmental footprint
  7. Molybdenum isotopes as paleoredox proxy
  8. The application of iron isotopes to ore forming systems

Target Audience:

Earth scientists from exploration, environment; students in particular

Short Course Organizer:

Mineralogical Association of Canada

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Bruce Eglington (USask), Bruce Taylor (GSC), Mostafa Fayek (UManitoba), Dominique Weiss (UBC), Elizabeth King (UBC), Laura Bilenker (UBC)

Price:

$350 for professional / $130 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and 1 lunch on Saturday

Pre-conference One-Day Short Courses

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Description:

The short course is aimed at senior students and geological professionals alike and aims to create awareness for the potential of geology and geochemistry in providing forensic intelligence in criminal cases, law enforcement resource management, food authentication, endangered animals and associated topics. The morning sessions will provide an introduction to the essential topics and the afternoon session will provide a hands-on experience using a mock crime scenario that will be solved by the participants using the open source R statistical software and dedicated scripts provided by the presenters.

Program details

  1. Introduction to workshop & software installation (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • Introduction of learning outcomes
    • Introduction of lecturers and participants
    • Installation of R software & packages.
  2. Principles of forensic science (JH)
    • Forensic work flow (crime scene, chain of custody,...)
    • Hypothesis generation
    • Evidential value assessment
  3. The use of geology in forensic science (JH)
    • History of dirt and dust in forensics
    • Geophysics: Detection of forensic anomalies
    • Geochemistry: Microscopy, Mineralogy, Elementary and Isotopic composition
  4. Geochemical mapping (PdC & JMcK)
    • Sampling design
    • Analytical methods
    • Compositional data
    • Spatial statistics
    • Presentation of geochemical data
  5. Casework examples (JH)
    • Food authentication
    • Provenancing of cannabis
    • Provenancing of human remains
  6. Hands-on geochemical mapping with R (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • Spatial data structures
    • Coordinate systems
    • Spatial statistics in R
    • Forensic reporting
  7. Mock case competition (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • Teams work through mock case scenario
  8. Case presentation and discussion (JH, PdC & & JMcK)
    • 5 minute team presentation
    • Discussion & evaluation of short course

Target Audience:

Senior students and geological professionals.

Short Course Organizer:

National Centre Forensic Studies, University of Canberra, Australia.

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr Jurian Hoogewerff (Short Course Coordinator). Associate Professor Forensic Geochemistry, National Centre Forensic Studies, University of Canberra. Australia.

Expert in forensic chemistry, isotope provenancing and geochemical mapping.

Dr Patrice de Caritat, Senior Scientist Geoscience Australia and Australian Federal Police, Canberra, Australia.

Expert in geochemical mapping, soil and ore mineralogy and presently seconded to the AFP to develop forensic soil capabilities.

Dr Jennifer McKinley, Reader Geostatistics, School of Natural and Built Environment, Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Expert in geochemical mapping, geostatistics, data analysis and forensic applications.

Price:

$250 Include course notes, coffee breaks (no lunch).

Description:

Mineral chemistry methods have long been routinely and successfully employed in diamond exploration, and over the past decade have also been increasingly utilised in base and precious metal exploration. Some of these methods promise great potential to improve assessment of metallogenic fertility and vectoring to mineralisation, and will undoubtedly see much wider application in exploration programs in the years to come.

Objectives:

This one-day short course is intended to introduce exploration geologists and geochemist to the state of the art of key mineral chemistry methods used in the exploration for diamond, porphyry copper, epithermal gold and orogenic gold deposits. The short course will be presented by a high-calibre team from industry and academia, and will focus on exploration-relevant applications and case studies, while also providing an adequate understanding of the scientific and analytical fundamentals.

Target Audience:

Geoscientists, exploration managers, geochemists, geologists.

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Christian Ihlenfeld is the Lead Geochemist with Anglo American for greenfield mineral exploration, well versed in the application of mineral chemistry studies in exploration. In addition to Christian, the course will include well known mineral chemistry proponents including John Dilles (porphyry Zircons), David Cooke (Green rock and lithocaps, epidote, chlorite), George Beaudoin (Magnetite Chemistry) and R. Preston (Diamond Exploration).

Price:

$350 for professional / $175 student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Geochemistry remains one of the fundamental tools used in mineral exploration along with geology and geophysics, however, underlying fundamentals that govern the behavior of chemical elements in the environment is often poorly understood by geologists leading to inappropriate application. Modern analytical techniques often provide a wealth of trace element information for 50 plus elements at sub ppm level, however, few organisations maximise the value of this information in the context of target selection, prioritisation and geochemical-geological mapping.

Objectives:

This short course is intended to introduce the geologist / geochemist to simple fundamental concepts that govern the distribution and dispersion of chemical elements in mineral deposits and the natural environment and apply the principles to the design of surveys, analytical methodology/technology, target selection/prioritisation and lessons to be learnt from survey post-mortems.

Target Audience:

Geologists, exploration project managers, junior scientists, junior and aspiring geochemists

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Dr. Peter Winterburn is an Exploration Geochemist with over 25 years of experience in industry prior to joining the Mineral Deposit Research Unit, Peter was previously employed by Anglo American plc as their Regional Geochemist in Africa and subsequently in South America. Peter also held the post of Chief Geochemist: Global Exploration with Vale based out of Toronto, Canada. In addition, Peter has worked in over 60 countries providing practical exploration geochemical solutions and training in a range of environments from tropical to arctic to arid deserts in both mountainous and subdued terrains. Peter is currently the NSERC/AcmeLabs/Bureau Veritas Minerals Research Chair in Exploration Geochemistry at MDRU, where he directs a program aimed at answering many of the questions and providing practical applications with respect to the discovery of minerals deposits through transported overburden.

Price:

$350 for professional / $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

Geoscientists Canada last year developed a one day short course specifically for students to improve basic awareness at the university level about resources reporting and the role of the QP. The course covers all resources reporting mining, energy and also speak to water resources and environmental reporting. It is designed to be of benefit to all students regardless of their subsequent career direction.

The course consists of 4 quarter-day modules each with an accompanying breakout group exercise involving discussion and plenary exchange.

The 4 modules cover:
  1. Reporting Issuer and Securities Background & Case Study 1
  2. Qualified Person & Case Study 2
  3. Mining and NI 43-101 Overview & Case Study 3
  4. Oil & Gas and NI 51-101 Overview & Case Study 4

For RFG, the current course will be significantly adapted so it is less Canada- centric, has strong international content and broad student and regular delegate appeal

Objectives:

Important features of the course are:

It is pitched for students at a career ahead awareness level. It is not a how-to course so is not suitable for P.Geo or others seeking to train as a QP per se. (There are many specific professional-level CPD products available elsewhere for this purpose). However the course would be of interest to a broad range of geoscientists at any career stage, seeking a solid introduction to the expanding topic of public reporting It uses both energy and mining reporting to introduce all types of public reporting by professionals - hence it targets all students regardless of whether or not they plan to pursue an industry career in geoscience or not It can be presented by one person if they are comfortable presenting both the mining and energy sections; ideally it should be delivered by a tag team of two or more geoscientists working together - at least one with an energy and one with a mining background Those students who attend receive a certificate that they can cite in their resumes.

Target Audience:

Primarily student delegates. Of interest to a broad range of geoscientists at any career stage, seeking a solid introduction to the expanding topic of public reporting

Short Course Organizer:

Geoscientists Canada

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Garth Kirkham

President, Kirkham Geosystems Ltd.

Price:

free of charge to student delegates and $150 for professional

Include coffee breaks (no lunch)

Post-conference One-Day Short Courses

Friday, June 22, 2018

Description:

Over the last decade, in almost every industry, there has been rapid growth in the application of data analytics to business decisions. Consequently, to be successful, the mining industry will have to rapidly adopt and apply the power of data analytics to the ever-growing volume of geochemical data sets that will be amassed over the next 10 years. Participants in this workshop will learn several data analytic methods applicable to geochemical data analysis that will serve them well in the future.

Multi-element geochemical datasets collected during government surveys or mineral exploration programs are a rich source of information, useful in mineral exploration, geologic mapping and environmental applications. These datasets commonly contain many thousands of observations (sample sites) analyzed for more than 50 elements. Compositional variations in samples from these surveys reflect different geologic processes responsible for their formation. These processes can be elucidated using the stoichiometry and mineralogy of the geological materials sampled, coupled with an appreciation for the methods used to collect and analyze the samples.

Geochemical data are compositional and thus is affected by the problem of closure; the constant sum constraint that interferes with the effective use of many data analysis methods. Formation of simple molar element ratios resolves the constant sum problem and readily and effectively model processes controlled by mineral stoichiometry and metasomatism. Log-ratios of compositional data also avoid the constant sum problem, but allow use of a wider range of statistical tools to unlock valuable information contained therein. Collectively, these data analytic methods can be applied at many stages of investigation, from process ‘discovery’ through ‘validation’ and into ‘prediction’.

A range of multivariate data analytic methods will be demonstrated to ‘discover’, ‘validate’, and ‘predict’ processes in geochemical data. These methods employ both linear and non-linear methods to identify patterns of import in the data.

Topics presented will include:

  • Methods used to ‘discover’ processes include: log-ratio analysis, principal component analysis, independent component analysis, multi-dimensional scaling, minimum/maximum autocorrelation factor analysis, and various types of cluster analysis;
  • Methods used to ‘validate’ geochemical processes, including: Pearce and general element ratio analysis to identify primary, alteration and mineralization processes using lithogeochemistry data;
  • Methods used to ‘predict’ geochemical processes including linear/quadratic discriminant analysis, neural networks, logistic regression, random forests, support vector machines, geospatial coherence and others; and
  • Other methods, including the use of the continuous wavelet transform for detecting multiscale geological boundaries in drill hole geochemical data, multi-fractal techniques for anomaly recognition in covered terrains, and multivariate geostatistical approaches to mapping geochemical processes.

Objectives:

Participants of this workshop will learn methods for data analytics in geochemistry. The workshop will cover the application of; applying ratios and logratios to compositional data; molar element ratio methods; multivariate methods including principal component analysis, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, classification and regression trees, multi-fractals, and linear/non-linear geostatistics.

Target Audience:

Geologists, geochemists, data management, GIS. Statisticians, Earth Scientists

Short Course Organizer:

AAG

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Natalie Caciagli, Juan Carlos Ordonez-Calderon, Qiuming Cheng, Eric Grunsky, June Hill, Jennifer McKinley, Ute Mueller, Cliff Stanley, Raimon Tolosana-Delgado.

Price:

$350 for professional and $175 for student

Include course notes, coffee breaks and lunch

Description:

This one-day short course will provide a provide a ‘state of the art’ training in all aspect of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) with a focus on research frontiers related to resource exploration and environmental/ climate change. The basics will be covered in the morning sessions: continental and oceanic flood basalts and their plumbing systems (layered intrusions, sills, dykes & deep crustal underplating). There will be an overview of additional topics: Archean LIPs, planetary analogues, associated Silicic LIPs (SLIPs), carbonatites and kimberlites, origin (plume & alternatives), links to continental breakup and the supercontinent cycle, geochemistry, associated topographic effects (regional uplift & basin formation) & associated compressional tectonics. The afternoon sessions will first focus on links with resource implications (metallogeny, oil/gas and aquifer systems). The links with a broad range of commodity types are captured in our 5-part classification system and we will also present our latest strategies for using the LIPs record in multi-commodity, multi-scale exploration targeting. The second afternoon focus will be on the rapidly developing links with dramatic environmental & climate change including mass extinction events. We summarize the latest research on the role of LIPs (and SLIPs) in dramatically changing atmospheric and oceanic composition through time, including global warming, glaciations, anoxia, step-wise oxygenation, acid rain/ocean acidification, enhanced hydrothermal and terrestrial nutrient fluxes, and mercury poisoning.

Objectives:

Provides an overview of all aspects of LIPs

Target Audience:

Students and professional geoscientists

Short Course Organizer:

GAC

Facilitator(s)/Instructor(s):

Richard E. Ernst

After finishing undergraduate work at Wesleyan University in 1978, Dr. Richard E. Ernst was attracted north to Canada by geological field research, and he received an MSc from the University of Toronto in 1981, and PhD from Carleton University in 1989. He then worked until 2003 on contracts mainly through the Geological Survey of Canada. At this point he started his own consulting firm 'Ernst Geosciences', and also became an Adjunct Professor at Carleton University. He has been co-leader (2003-2013), and leader since 2013 of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) Commission of IAVCEI (International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior). In 2009, Dr. Ernst co- launched a consortium of industry sponsors contributing 1.5 million dollars toward using the LIP's record to reconstruct the arrangement of crustal blocks within supercontinents back through time. In April 2012, he was PI on a successful 700 thousand dollars NSERC CRD grant to support graduate student research on LIPs in his position as Scientist-in-Residence of the Faculty of Science at Carleton University. Dr. Ernst completed a comprehensive book on Large Igneous Provinces for Cambridge University Press (published September 2014), and recently published (with colleagues) in Nature Geoscience (April 2016) on using the LIP record to demonstrate a connection between southern Siberia and northern Laurentia throughout much of the Proterozoic. In April 2014 he also became a part time professor at Tomsk State University, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia.

Simon M. Jowitt

Simon Jowitt is an assistant professor in Economic Geology at the University of Las Vegas, USA. He was educated in the UK, acquiring a BSc (Hons) at the University of Edinburg, an MSc at the Camborne School of Mines and a PhD at the University of Leicester. Prior to taking up his current position he spent several years at Monash University in Australia working on various aspects of economic geology and igneous petrology, including the supply of critical metals. Simon's current research focuses on the use of geochemistry to unravel geological processes in a variety of settings with direct application to mineralizing systems, igneous petrology, mineral exploration, global tectonics and the links between magmatism and metallogeny. He has extensive expertise in mineral economics, and the "economic" side of economic geology, and has several recent publications on global Cu, Ni, Co, Pb-Zn, rare earth element and indium resources. He was awarded of the Society of Economic Geologists Lindgren Award in 2014 and IoM3 Mann Redmayne Medals in 2013 and 2016.

Price:

$250 Include coffee breaks and lunch